MIA: Marxist Writers: James P. Cannon

James P. Cannon Internet Archive

The

James P. Cannon

Internet Archive


1920 to 1928: James P. Cannon and the Early Years of American Communism: Selected Writings and Speeches, 1920-1928. The complete book, consisting of 66 articles, letters, extracts from minutes and speeches, plus an introductory overview of Cannon’s role in the early CP. Published by Spartacist Publishing Company in 1992, introductory material and notes by the Prometheus Research Library.

 


Jump to specific year:
1919 – 1922 | 1923 | 1924 – 1925 | 1926 – 1927 – 1928 | 1929 | 1930 | 1931 | 1932 | 1933 | 1934 – 1935 | 1936 – 1937 | 1938 – 1940 | 1941 – 1948 | 1951 | 1953 | 1954 – 1959 | 1961 – 1967


1919 – 1922

1919, February: Open Letter to the Conference Called by the Authorized Committee of the 16 Standard Railroad Labor Organizations from the Central Executive Committee of the Workers Party of America

1919, August: Letter from James P. Cannon in Kansas City, MO to John Reed and Ben Gitlow in New York, August 16, 1919.

1921, April: The Story of Alex Howat

1921, December: Speech at the First Workers Party Convention

1922, February: Open Letter to the Conference Called by the Authorized Committee of the 16 Standard Railroad Labor Organizations from the Central Executive Committee of the Workers Party of America

1922, June: Report on the United States of America, a document prepared for the Comintern A newly formated PDF of the same report here.

 

1923

1923, February: Scott Nearing and the Workers Party

1923, March: What Kind of a Party?

1923, November: Our Labor Party Policy

 

1924 – 1925

1924: How to Organise and Conduct a Study Class

1924, May: St. Paul—June 17th

1924, July: Letter to M. Hansen, Secretary, English Branch - Seattle, WPA, from James P. Cannon, Assistant Executive Secondary, WPA, July 22, 1924

1924, July: New Party Industrial Registration In this article from the Daily Worker, Assistant Executive Secretary of the Workers Party of America announces a new industrial registration of the entire party membership in line with Comintern’s “Bolshevizatoin” policy.

1924, August: Letter to Rose Pastor Stokes in Hinsdale, MA

1924, October: The Bolshevization of the Party

1925, March: On Boshevization and a Labor Party: Speech to the 5th Plenum of the Enlarged Executive Committee of the Communist International, Moscow—March 30, 1925

 

1926 –1927

1926: Eugene V. Debs – Hail and Farewell! A Statement on His Death by the International Labor Defense [event of Oct. 20, 1926] Despite the bitter internecine warfare between the rightward-trending Socialist Party of America and the ever-more-shrill and doctrinaire Workers (Communist) Party, SPA leader Eugene V. Debs remained a figure held in high esteem in the opposing camp, as this short memorial by Jim Cannon indicates. “The prisoner of Woodstock and Atlanta was close kin to all persecuted and imprisoned workers,” Cannon writes. “Comrade Debs was not one of those who shrug shoulders at the imprisonment of workers as though it were a matter of small concern. He burned with indignation at ever case of capitalist persecution and was always in the vanguard of the fight for its victims, whoever they might be and whatever their political views or affiliations.” Cannon declares that Debs “had nothing in common with these elements represented by the Jewish Daily Forward who fire from ambush at the movement for united labor defense. He helped to build where they try to disrupt.” Debs remained on the National Committee of the ILD until his death, Cannon notes.

1927: Ruthenberg, the Fighter: The Passing of an American Pioneer

 

1928

1928, October: For the Russian Opposition! (Against Opportunism and Bureaucracy in the Workers (Communist) Party) (with Martin Abern & Max Shachtman)

1928, October: To the Party Members

1928, November: Concerning Our Expulsion

1928, November: Fortress of the World Revolution

1928, December: The Party “Discussion” Opens!

1928, December: Trotsky’s Book and Its Bourgeois Critics (A review of Leon Trotsky’s The Real Situation In Russia)

1928, December: Gangsterism!

1928, December 17 : Our Appeal Against Expulsion from the Communist Party

 

1929

1929: Where is the Left Wing Going?

1929: The Communists and the “Progressives”

1929: The New Unions and the Communists

1929: Platform of the Communist Opposition [together with Martin Abern, Max Shachtman & Arne Swabeck]

1929, January: A Burglary—Its Political Meaning

1929, March: Call for a National Conference of the Opposition

1929, March: A Letter to International Labor Defense (with Rose Karsner & Max Shachtman)

1929, March: Results Of The Party Convention

1929, April: Next Steps in the Struggle

1929, April: The Labor Revolt In The South

1929, April: Organize The Unorganized Communists

1929, May: The Lost Leader

1929, May: May Day—Our Conference and The Trade Unions

1929, June: Conference of the Opposition Communists

1929, August: The Crisis In The Communist Party

1929, August: Vincent St. John

 

1930

1930, January: The Struggle For The South

1930, February: The Socialist Party and Radicalization of the Masses

1930, February: Passaic Strike Anniversary: Some Lessons in Militant Labor Leadership for the Future

1930, April: Karl Marx, The Man

1930, May: Character and Limits of Our Faction

1930, June: Back to Lenin! Manifesto to the Rank and File and Seventh National Convention of the C.P.U.S.A. (with Max Shachtman & 5 others)

1930, June: My Life – and Its Critics

1930, June: The Plenum of the American Communist Opposition

1930, June/July: Aftermath of the Needle Trades Convention

1930, July: Opposition Problems – Deeper into the Party!

 

1931

1931, February: American Syndicalism and Problems of Communism

1931, March: “Against Exaggeration”

1931, March: For the Program of Expansion

1931, March: A Great Step Forward

1931, March: How the Miners Were Defeated

1931, March: Lenin and the Iskra Period

1931, March: Miller Goes Over to Muste

1931, March: Miller’s Manifesto

1931, March: More Treason to the Miners

1931, March: Trifling With the Negro Question

1931, April: Communism and Syndicalism

1931, April: The Communists and the Progressives

1931, April: A Dangerous Situation

1931, April: The Death of John Donlin (obituary)

1931, April: Herberg Quotes Trotsky

1931, April: Lawrence Gives the Signal

1931, April: Lying as a Political System

1931, April: The Oppositionists at the May Day Conference

1931, April: The Trade Union Turn

1931, May: The Affair at City College

1931, May: Fighting for Free Speech

1931, May: The Miners’ Convention

1931, May: Now for the Weekly Militant!

1931, May: The Right Wing Capitulators

1931, May: What About Morgenstern and Goodman?

1931, May: The White Collar Unemployed

1931, June: Assembling the Future Staff

1931, June: Bolshevik Organization

1931, June: Strike “Strategy”

1931, June: The Struggle Against “Left” Reformism

1931, June: What Is Socialism?

1931, July: The Capitalist Offensive

1931, July: Even A Browder Can Learn

1931, July: Our Revolution

1931, July: Reviving The Appeal to Reason

1931, July: Saving Germany From Whom?

1931, July: Stalinism and the German Crisis

1931, July: They Overlooked the German Situation

1931, July: The Union Square Meeting

1931, August: Again the Union Square Meeting

1931, August: Bernard Shaw on Russia

1931, August: Debating the Dole

1931, August: Field Organizers of the Opposition

1931, August: Free Speech and the Labor Movement

1931, August: Losovsky Unloads the Blame ...

1931, August: Silk Revolt Growing

1931, August: They Say It With Flowers

1931, August: Wage Cuts and Strikes

1931, August: A Welcome Reversal

1931, August: What Is a Renegade?

1931, September: Consolidate the Weekly!

1931, September: A Reply To The Discussion

1931, September: The Return of Gerry Allard

1931, September: Tasks Of Our National Conference

1931, September: Where Is the British Communist Party?

1931, October: An Apologist For Stalinism

1931, October: The Dressmakers’ Symposium

1931, October: Furriers’ Unity

1931, October: Hail, Young Spartacus!

1931, October: Laying The Foundations

1931, November: Amter Will Get Your Money Back?

1931, November: The Case Of Theodore Dreiser

1931, November: The End of the Lawrence Strike

1931, November: The Marine Workers Tortured in Jail – Defendants Plead Not Guilty on Charges in the New York “Dynamite Plot”

1931, November: The Membership Campaign

1931, November: The Opposition on the Offensive

1931, November: Where Is the Mooney Movement?

1931, December: The Canadian Communist Trials

1931, December: The Downfall of the Volkszeitung

1931, December: Greetings to Communistes

1931, December: How They Play with the Great Slogans

1931, December: The “Hunger March”

1931, December: The Kentucky Miners

1931, December: On Which Side?

1931, December: The Opposition on the Eve of Great Advances

1931, December: A Race With Time

 

1932

1932, January: Another Defeat in Kentucky

1932, January: Attacking the Marine Workers’ Defense

1932, January: Bombs for New Year’s

1932, January: Darrow and the Scottsboro Case

1932, January: Evidence Made to Order

1932, January: Father Cox

1932, January: Foreign-Language Work Of The CLA

1932, January: A Progressive Tendency

1932, January: Proletarian Party Split

1932, January: A Sorry Adventure

1932, January: United Front Prospects

1932, January:: Where Did They Learn?

1932, February: I.W.W. Wisdom

1932, February: Lassalle

1932, February: Learn from the Workers

1932, February: Morgenstern and Goodman

1932, February: United Front in Practice

1932, March: The Threat of Illegality and the Mood of the Workers

1932, March: A False Slogan

1932, April: Two Articles on the Slogan “Rank-and-File Leadership”

1932, April: Left Wing Victory or Treacherous Bargain?

1932, April: Statement on the Situation in the International Left Opposition

1932, April: Scottsboro

1932, April: Trade Union Unity and the ILGWU

1932, April: Why So Hot?

1932, May: Centrist-Right Wing Unity?

1932, May: Bring the Unity Negotiations into the Open!

1932, May: The “Negotiators” Smoked Out

1932, May: Reply to Comrade Bojarsky

1932, May: Ungrateful Government

1932, May: Weisbord Blows The Whistle

1932, June: The Case of J.T. Murphy

1932, June: The Right Wing in a Blind Alley

1932, August: On Stalinist-Pacifist Relations at the Anti-War Conference A Letter to Roger Baldwin

 

1933

1933: The New Party Turn

1933: The New York Unemployed Conference

1933: Albany: Three Years of Party Policy

1933: The Left Wing Needs a New Policy and a New Leadership

1933: For a United Front to Defend Mooney

1933: The Lynching Wave and American Fascism

1933: The AFL, the Strike Wave, and Trade Union Perspectives

1933: Strike the Hotels!

 

1934 – 1935

1934: All Out to Madison Square on May Day

1934: New Defense Organization Needed

1934: The Furriers and the Needle-Trade Unions

1934: Strike Call of Local 574 From the Daily Strike Bulletins of the 1934 Truckers Strike

1934: “... If It Takes All Summer” From the Daily Strike Bulletins of the 1934 Truckers Strike

1934: Eternal Vigilance From the Daily Strike Bulletins of the 1934 Truckers Strike

1934: Spilling the Dirt—a Bughouse Fable From the Daily Strike Bulletins of the 1934 Truckers Strike

1934: Drivers’ Strike Reveals Workers’ Great Resources From the Daily Strike Bulletins of the 1934 Truckers Strike

1934: Thanks to Pine County Farmers From the Daily Strike Bulletins of the 1934 Truckers Strike

1934: The Secret of Local 574 From the Daily Strike Bulletins of the 1934 Truckers Strike

1934: What the Union Means From the Daily Strike Bulletins of the 1934 Truckers Strike

1934: Learn from Minneapolis!

1934: Victory in Minneapolis!

1934: The Meaning of Minneapolis

1934: In the Spirit of the Pioneers Labor Action

1934: For Fusion with the AWP

1934: The Strike Wave and the Left Wing

1934: The Socialist Party Convention

1934: The New Militant

1934: Non-Partisan Defense

1934, December: Alarm Signals in the Soviet Union! (with A.J. Muste) The New Militant

1935: At the Crossroads in the Socialist Party

1935, February: The Truth About Sacramento – How C.P. Tactics Hurt Defendants The New Militant

 

1936 – 1937

1936: Is Everybody Happy? Labor Action

1936: The Maritime Strike Labor Action

1936: Deeper into the Unions Labor Action

1936: The Color of Arsenic - and Just as Poisonous Labor Action

1937: Four Days that Shook the Waterfront Labor Action

1937: The Champion from Far Labor Action

1937: After the Maritime Strike Labor Action

 

1938 – 1940

1938: The New Party Is Founded

1938: Jersey City: Lesson and Warning

1939: The New Policy of Stalinism in America

1939: Speech on the Russian Question

1940, August 28: To the memory of the old man (Trotsky obituary) [speech]

1940: The Struggle for a Proletarian Party

1940: The Convention of the Socialist Workers Party

1940: Military Policy of the Proletariat

1940: The Pathology of Renegacy

1940: First Results of our Military Policy

1940: Militarism and Workers' Rights

1940: Lenin, Trotsky and the First World War

 

1941 – 1948

1941: Socialism On Trial

1941: A Statement on the War

1942: The Attack on The Militant They Collaborate with Fascists Abroad and Attack Freedom of the Press at Home

1942: The Russian Revolution A PDF of the original first edition of this pamphlet. Includes a speech given in 1922.

1943: The End of the Comintern And The Prospects of Labor Internationalism

1943: Campaign for a Labor Party!

1944: The First Days of American Communism

1944: The Dog Days of the Left Opposition

1944: The Great Minneapolis Strikes

1944, August: Comment on James T. Farrell

1945, January: An Insult to the Party

1945: The Bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

1946: Theses on the American Revolution [The American Theses]

1946: The Coming American Revolution

1947: The Treason of the Intellectuals

1947: American Stalinism and Anti-Stalinism

1947, May: Speech on Unity between the SWP and the WP

1948: 1948 Wallace Campaign : ‘A Diversion & An Obstacle’

1948: The Two Americas

 

1951

1951: The Trend of the Twentieth Century

1951: Youth and Foreign Policy

1951: The Road to Peace: According to Stalin and According to Lenin

 

1953

1953, 16 January: America Under the Workers’ Rule

1953, 23 January: What Socialist America Will Look Like

1953: Defending Trade Unionists And Revolutionists

1953: Letter from James P. Cannon to Farrell Dobbs , March 9, 1953. From Toward A History of the Fourth International

1953: Letter James P. Cannon to Michel Pablo From Toward A History of the Fourth International

1953: Letter from James P. Cannon to Sam Gordon, June 4, 1953. From Toward A History of the Fourth International

1953: Letter from James P. Cannon to Farrell Dobbs, July 9, 1953. From Trotskyism versus Revisionism

1953: Letter from James P. Cannon to George Novack, September 2, 1953. From Trotskyism versus Revisionism

1953: Letter from James P. Cannon to George Novack, September 3, 1953. From Trotskyism versus Revisionism

1953: Letter from James P. Cannon to Farrell Dobbs, September 18, 1953. From Trotskyism versus Revisionism

1953: Letter from James P. Cannon to Farrell Dobbs, December 7, 1953. From Toward a History of the Fourth International

1953: Internationalism and the SWP

1953: Happy Birthday, Arne Swabeck

1953: Factional Struggle and Party Leadership

 

1954 – 1959

1954: Letter from James P. Cannon to George Breitman, January 12, 1954. From Toward a History of the Fourth International

1954: Letter to Leslie Goonewardene February 23, 1954. From Toward a History of the Fourth International

1954: Letter to Leslie Goonewardene May 12, 1954. From Toward a History of the Fourth International

1954: Letter from James P. Cannon to George Breitman, March 1, 1954. From Toward a History of the Fourth International

1954: Letter from James P. Cannon to Farrell Dobbs April 13, 1954. From Toward a History of the Fourth International

1954: Letter from James P. Cannon to Farrell Dobbs April 24, 1954. From Toward a History of the Fourth International

1954: Letter from James P. Cannon to Farrell Dobbs April 28, 1954. From Toward a History of the Fourth International

1954: Letter from James P. Cannon to Farrell Dobbs May 12, 1954. From Toward a History of the Fourth International

1954: Letter from James P. Cannon to Farrell Dobbs June 3, 1954. From Toward a History of the Fourth International

1954: Letter from James P. Cannon to Farrell Dobbs July 16, 1954. From Toward a History of the Fourth International

1954: William Z. Foster: An Appraisal of the Man and His Career

1954: Fascism and the Workers’ Movement.

1954: The Degeneration of the Communist Party and the New Beginning

1954: Trotsky or Deutscher? On the New Revisionism and Its Theoretical Source

1954 to 1956: Letters to a Historian: Nine articles from Fourth International and International Socialist Review, based on 22 letters written to Theodore Draper, who was researching his history of the US Communist Party.

1955, June: The I.W.W.

1955, June: Engels on the American Question

1956: E.V. Debs

1956: Trotsky on America

1957, June : Socialism and Democracy

1959, May 27: The Decision to Join the Trotskyist Camp in 1928

1959, Summer : The Russian Revolution and the Black Struggle in the United States

1961 – 1967

1960: American Radicalism: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow

1960: Letter to Tom Kerry on Fighting Fascism

1961: New Revolutionary Forces Are Emerging

1961: Intellectuals and Revolution

1967: “Don't Strangle the Party!”

1967: The Revolutionary Party & Its Role in the Struggle for Socialism


Last updated on: 1.1.2014