Marx-Engels Correspondence 1869

Letter from Marx to Engels
In Manchester


Written: November 18, 1868;
Source: Marx and Engels Correspondence;
Publisher: International Publishers (1968);
First Published: Gestamtausgabe;
Translated: Donna Torr;
Transcribed: Sally Ryan in 1999;
HTML Markup: Sally Ryan.

Last Tuesday I opened the discussion on Point No. I, the attitude of the British Ministry to the Irish Amnesty question. Made a speech of about three-quarters of an hour, much cheered, and then proposed the following resolutions on Point No. I:

Resolved :

that in his reply to the Irish demands for the release of the imprisoned Irish patriots--a reply contained in his letter to Mr. O'Shea, etc., etc.--Mr. Gladstone deliberately insults the Irish nation;

that he clogs political amnesty with conditions alike degrading to the victims of misgovernment and, the people they belong to;

that having, in the teeth of his responsible position, publicly and enthusiastically cheered on the American slaveholders' rebellion, he now steps in to preach to the Irish people the doctrine of passive obedience;

that his whole proceedings with reference to the Irish Amnesty question are the true and genuine offspring of that "policy of conquest," by the fiery denunciation of which Mr. Gladstone ousted his Tory rivals from office;

that the General Council of the "International Workingmen's Association" express their admiration of the spirited, firm and high-souled manner in which the Irish people carry on their Amnesty movement;

that these resolutions be communicated to all branches of, workingmen's bodies connected with, the "International Workingmen's Association" in Europe and America.