V. I. Lenin

Among the Newspapers and Magazines (June 24, 1906)

Written: Written on June 24 (July 7), 1906
Published: Published on June 25, 1906 in the newspaper Ekho No. 4. Printed from the Ekho text.
Source: Lenin Collected Works, Progress Publishers, 1977, Moscow, Volume 41, pages 181.2-182.1.
Translated: Yuri Sdobnikov
Transcription\Markup: R. Cymbala
Copyleft: V. I. Lenin Internet Archive (www.marxists.org) © 2004 Permission is granted to copy and/or distribute this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License.
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Rech{1} is resentful over the fact that in view of the rumours of a semi-Cadet, semi-bureaucratic ministry, the Left-wing press has begun to talk of a horse-trading deal between the Cadets and the camarilla, of a betrayal which is inevitable in any such deals.

“Is it necessary to prove that these assertions are false and absurd?” writes the indignant Rech.

It appears, Messrs. Cadets, that it is, and even highly, necessary to do so, because in the same article (“Famine and Politics”) we read:

“This struggle (between the Duma and the present ministry), a slow and hard struggle, has resulted, however, in the question concerning a responsible cabinet being brought down from the sphere of abstract considerations to the soil of concrete reality, and in it being discussed as one of the real possibilities.”

That is very good. But what about the question of dissolving the State Council, the question of amnesty, the question of universal, etc., suffrage? Have all these questions likewise become “real possibilities” already? Surely, they have not, have they? After all, there is so far not even a rumour about them.

That being so, what is one to do? “It is necessary to prove.”


{1} Rech (Speech)—a daily, the Central Organ of the Cadet Party, published in St. Petersburg from February 23 (March 8), 1906, under the editorship of P. N. Milyukov and I. V. Hessen, and with close collaboration from M. M. Vinaver, P. D. Dolgorukov, P. B. Struve and others. The newspaper was closed down by the Revolutionary Military Committee of the Petrograd Soviet on October 26 (November 8), 1917, but continued to appear until August 1918 under the names of Nasha Rech (Our Speech), Svobodnaya Rech (Free Speech), Vek (Age), Novaya Rech (New Speech), Nash Vek (This Age). p. 181

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