V. I.   Lenin


Written: Written before August 19, 1915
Published: First published in 1924 in Lenin Miscellany II. Sent from Sörenberg to Christiania (Oslo). Printed from the original.
Source: Lenin Collected Works, Progress Publishers, 1971, Moscow, Volume 36, page 341.
Translated: Andrew Rothstein
Transcription\Markup: R. Cymbala
Public Domain: Lenin Internet Archive.   You may freely copy, distribute, display and perform this work, as well as make derivative and commercial works. Please credit “Marxists Internet Archive” as your source.
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Dear A. M.,

The Vorkonferenz (II) has been postponed until Sept. 5.[1]

Höglund and the Left Norwegians (and what about the Danes?) must procure an invitation themselves. They should send their statements, requests and declarations to us (for the C.C.) in writing, signed and stamped, in one of the three international languages.

Very warm regards to Alexander (why is he only criticising my draft?[2] Let’s have your amendments, s’il vous plaît!)—and to you for your successful work among the Left in Scandinavia.


I think it is hardly likely that the conference will materialise soon, if at all. However, let Höglund prepare, seriously and urgently.

But are they willing to have a joint manifesto with us on behalf of the Left in the various countries (independently of the conference)?


[1] Instead of a second preliminary meeting at Zimmerwald, the conference proper was held there from September 5 to 8, 1915. It was the scene of a struggle between revolutionary internationalists led by Lenin, and the Kautskyite majority. Lenin organised his supporters into the Zimmerwald Left, a group in which the Bolshevik Party was alone in consistently following a correct and internationalist line against the war.

The conference adopted a manifesto, which declared the war to be imperialist, condemned the behaviour of the “socialists” who voted for the war credits and took part in bourgeois governments, and called on the workers of Europe to campaign against the war, for a peace without indemnities and annexations.

The conference also adopted a resolution expressing sympathy with the victims of war and elected an International Socialist Commission (I.S.K).

On the significance of the Zimmerwald Conference, see Lenin’s “The First Step” and “Revolutionary Marxists at the International Socialist Conference, Sept. 5–8, 1915” (present edition, Vol. 21, pp. 383–88 and 389–93).

[2] Lenin’s “The Draft Resolution Proposed by the Left Wing at Zimmerwald” (see present edition, Vol. 21, pp. 345–48).

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