MIA: Encyclopedia of Marxism: Glossary of Periodicals


La


 

Labor Action (1933-1935)

New York. Published by the Conference for Progressive Labor Action from January 1933 through December 15, 1934. It had replaced the CPLA organ, Labor Age that was published since the organizations founding in 1929. The CPLA was a radical workers organization that engaged in union organizing and solidarity with striking workers. It included among it’s ranks A. J. Muste, George Breitman and Art Preis. When the CPLA fused with the Communist League of America, the groups papers were merged to became The New Militant.

See Archive

Collection digitized by Marty Goodman, MD, Riazanov Library Project

 

Labor Action (1936-1937)

San Francisco. Published by the California Socialist Party from 1936 through early 1937. It was started as a voice for the Trotskyist dominated leaderhip of the party in California. The Trotskyists were particularly influential in the California labor movement and had been members of the Socialist Party nationally since the middle of 1936 when they dissolved their Workers Party of the U.S. in order enter en masse into the SP. Labor Action was edited by James P. Cannon having just arrived from editing the The Organizer, the newspaper of the fighting Teamsters Local 574 in Minneapolis, Minn. Labor Action had particularly good coverage of the Maritime Labor scene on the West Coast.

See Archive

Collection digitized by Marty Goodman, MD, Riazanov Library Project

 

Labor Age (1929 - 1933)

Labor Age was a left-labor monthly magazine published by the Labor Publication Society from 1921-1933. It succeeded the Socialist Review, journal of the Intercollegiate Socialist Society. Labor Age aligned with the League for Industrial Democracy, and during 1929-33 the magazine was affiliated with the Conference for Progressive Labor Action with A. J. Muste playing a prominent role. Other important figures associated with Labor Age were James Maurer, Harry W. Laidler, and Louis Budenz. The magazine advocated industrial unionism, economic planning and the nationalization of industries. It was also a major promoter of the workers education movement.

See Archive

Collection digitized by Marty Goodman, MD, Riazanov Library Project

 

Labor Defender (1926-1930)

The Labor Defender was U.S. pictorial monthly founded in 1926. While influenced most heavily by the new Communist Party it's national committee included socialists like Eugene V. Debs and Upton Sincliar. It was known for it's stunning cover art and large of use of photos of varoius workers struggle. It was the organ of the International Labor Defense, a class-struggle legal defense organization.

See Archive

Collection digitized by Marty Goodman, MD, Riazanov Library Project

 

Labor Herald (1922-1924)

Labor Herald was the official organ of the Trade Union Educational League (TUEL). Established by William Z. Foster in 1920 as a means of uniting radicals within various trade unions for a common plan of action. The group was subsidized by the Communist International via the Communist Party of America from 1922. The organization did not collect membership dues but instead ostensibly sought to both fund itself and to spread its ideas through the sale of pamphlets and circulation of a monthly magazine. After several years of initial success, the group was marginalized by the unions of the American Federation of Labor, which objected to its strategy of “boring from within” existing unions in order to depose sitting union leaderships.

See Archive

Collection digitized by Marty Goodman, MD, Riazanov Library Project

 

Labor Unity (1927-1934)

Labor Unity was the official organ of the Trade Union Unity League (TUEL). The TUUL was an industrial union umbrella organization of the Communist Party of the United States (CPUSA) between 1929 and 1935. The group was the American affiliate to the Red International of Labor Unions. It was the result of the Communist International’s Third Period policy, which dictated that affiliated Communist Parties pursue a strategy of dual unionism and thus abandon attempts to “bore from within” existing trade unions.

See Archive

Collection digitized by Marty Goodman, MD, Riazanov Library Project

 

Labor View (1946)

Chicago. Publication of the Revoutionary Workers League for their work in the CIO and other unions. Appears to be a shortlived attempt to take advantage of the post-war strike wave in 1946.

See Archive

Collection digitized by Marty Goodman, MD, Riazanov Library Project

 

Labour Leader

A weekly founded in 1 891. From 1893 it was an organ of the I.L.P.; from 1922, it was called the New Leader, and since 1946 it has been known as the Socialist Leader.

 

Labour Review (1952-1963)

Labour Review was published in London from 1952 until 1963 by the tendency associated with Gerry Healy. Originally it appeared very sporadically but from 1957 it appeared more regularly. From 1957 until 1959 it was one of the finest non-sectarian theoretical journals on the left internationally. With the foundation of the Socialist Labour League it became increasingly inward looking and was replaced by a journal called Fourth International in 1964.

 

L'Atelier

Montkly magazine published in Paris from 1840 to 1850. It was the organ of Christian artisans and workers with Socialistic sympathies.