Gauche Prolétarienne

I Will Testify in the Streets


Source: La Cause du Peuple, no. 29, Oct 14 1970;
Translated: for by Mitchell Abidor.

France’s Minister of the Interior made several attempts to shut down the Gauche Prolétarienne’s newspaper, La cause du Peuple. The party leader, Alain Geismar, was about to go on trial in October, 1970, one of a series of trials of leaders of the GP and editors of the newspaper.

In defying the Marcellin Law [1], which intends to forbid demonstrations and to put an end to the freedom to protest, Alain Geismar shows the path of honor.

Ever since the barricades of 68 he has said to the worker:

In order to defend yourself you must attack.

In order to find the time to live,

Slow down your work pace

Subdue the chiefs

Sabotage the boss’s production

For bad pay, do bad work

Strike out at the assassins

For the right to work,

A Deputy can be lynched

And a boss can be sequestrated

Organize yourselves without waiting for the consent of the men in ties who wear out their Bic pens in the boss’s office.

Union and Resistance!

For the freedom of expression.

For the right to live.

We will testify October 20, 21, and 22 in the factories and on the streets.

The trial of Geismar = the trial of the People.

Bosses and ministers: you can roar, maul, condemn, take away civil rights and family rights; your barriers will not resist.

You have sown hatred.

On October 20, you will reap.

1. Law that limited freedom of association by insisting on a system of prior approval for political groups and activities.