V. I.   Lenin




Published: First published in 1929 in the journal Proletarskaya Revolyutsiya No. 11. Sent from London to Samara. Printed from the original.
Source: Lenin Collected Works, Progress Publishers, 1977, Moscow, Volume 37, page 355.
Translated: The Late George H. Hanna
Transcription\Markup: D. Moros
Public Domain: Lenin Internet Archive.   You may freely copy, distribute, display and perform this work, as well as make derivative and commercial works. Please credit “Marxists Internet Archive” as your source.
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February 4, 1903

Mother dearest,

It is a very long time since I received as much as a single letter from you or any of our people. One of your letters must have gone astray, because I cannot believe that nobody has written to me all this time. I don’t know whether Mitya came to visit you, whether he stayed for long, what his plans are, and where he is now. Have you had any news of Anyuta, did she move to Port Arthur[1] and when? Are you well? Is the weather in Russia really still as cold as ever?

The weather here is fine. It has been an exceptionally good mild winter, with very little rain or fog (so far). Y. V., it is true, still gets ill rather often; she is ill now but not very badly, so we are making do with home treatment and Russian remedies. It would probably be good for her to move somewhere further south. Nadya and I are both well and are jogging along as usual. We recently went to our first concert this winter and were very pleased with it—especially with Chaikovsky’s latest symphony (Symphonic pathétique). Are there any good concerts in Samara? We went once to a German theatre but what we should like would be to visit the Russian Art Theatre and see The Lower Depths.

I embrace you fondly, my dear, and wish you everything of the best, especially health. Regards to all; perhaps you will forward the letter to Anyuta. Otherwise, when shall I learn her address?

V. Ulyanov

Have I got your address right?


[1] Lenin’s sister Anna went to Port Arthur with her husband, Mark Yelizarov, who was at that time employed on the railway in the Far East.

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