V. I.   Lenin

Privileges for Locomotive Repair Workers

Draft Decision for the C.P.C.[1]

Written: Written February 5, 1920
Published: First published in 1933 in Lenin Miscellany XXIV. Printed from the manuscript.
Source: Lenin Collected Works, UNAVAILABLE, UNAVAILABLE, Moscow, Volume 42, page 166b.
Translated: Bernard Isaacs
Transcription\Markup: D. Walters
Public Domain: Lenin Internet Archive (2003). You may freely copy, distribute, display and perform this work; as well as make derivative and commercial works. Please credit “Marxists Internet Archive” as your source.
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1) Publish reports about goods trains as a reward for repairs.

2) Instruct the Commissariat for Railways to draw up such a plan of rewards as would provide only for essential repairs being made on goods trains, and not special repairs.

3) All data concerning goods train repairs to be collected and supplemented, and passed on to the Central Statistical Board to be worked up.

4) The A.C.C.T.U. and the Moscow, Petrograd, Ivanovo and Tver trade union councils to be charged with working up the question of using the best workshops for repairs all 24 hours of the day.[2]


[1] This draft was moved by Lenin at a meeting of the Council of People’s Commissars on February 5, 1920, in connection with L. B. Krasin’s report on the question of granting privileges to workers engaged on locomotive repairs and the production of spare parts for transport.

The following resolution was adopted on the report: ’The S.E.C., the Commissariat for Food and the Commissariat for Railways are instructed to examine in detail the question of all privileges applying to workers engaged in locomotive repairs and the production of spare parts for transport, and to present a list of factories to the C.P.C.”

[2] The question of “using the best workshops for repairs all 24 hours of the day” was discussed at a meeting of the C.P.C. on March 16, 1920. The question of intensive and uninterrupted work on the repair of locomotives was raised by Lenin in connection with the catastrophic state of railway transport, and this led to a number of other questions being discussed at the same Council meeting, namely: the possibility of placing an order abroad for locomotives and spare parts for repairing railway transport, and an inspection of factories and works engaged in the repair of goods train cars and engines.

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