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Workers’ Liberty
& Solidarity
[London]

(1985-present)


DRAFT INTRODUCTION ONLY: Publication of the Alliance for Workers Liberty in the United Kingdom. The group has been identified with the theorist Sean Matgamna throughout its history. It emphasises working-class political independence, radical democracy and anti-Stalinism. The AWL publishes the newspaper Solidarity as well as the magazine Workers’s Liberty. The AWL traces its origins to the document What we are and what we must become, written by the tendency’s founder Sean Matgamna in 1966 in which he argued that the Revolutionary Socialist League, by then effectively the Militant tendency, was too inward looking and needed to become more activist in its orientation. The RSL refused to circulate the document and, with a handful of supporters, he left to form the Workers’ Fight group. Espousing left unity, they accepted an offer in 1968 to form a faction within the International Socialists lead by Tony Cliff as the Trotskyist Tendency before being expelled from the IS 3 years later.

Outside the IS, increased in size, the group resumed publication of Workers' Fight, now as a printed paper, not as was previously the case as a duplicated journal, began publication of a theoretical journal entitled Permanent Revolution and made efforts to publish a small number of workplace-oriented publications in specific industries.

At the end of 1975, it fused with the smaller Workers Power group, formerly the Left Faction within the IS, to form the International-Communist League. A small group of members in Bolton and Wigan opposed to the merger formed the Marxist Worker group, which later fused with the International Marxist Group. Workers' Fight was renamed Workers' Action and went over to a weekly publication schedule and the group's quarterly magazine was now entitled International-Communist. It joined with other groups that considered themselves to the left of the USFI in the Necessary International Initiative. In 1976, two-thirds of the ex-Workers Power group's members left in a dispute over Labour Party work and resumed a separate existence. The I-CL increased its activity within the Labour Party, and in 1978 helped set up the Socialist Campaign for a Labour Victory. This campaign proved relatively popular and initially involved a range of figures on the left of the Labour Party who wrote for and supported its paper, Socialist Organiser. After a dispute over whether local government rates should be increased to offset cuts made by the Thatcher government, most of the Labour left figures - including Ken Livingstone - withdrew from Socialist Organiser until the I-CL was the only force involved in what was now its central publication. Both Workers' Action and International-Communist were by 1979 discontinued, reflecting the group's entrism into the Labour Party.

In 1981 the I-CL fused with Alan Thornett's Workers Socialist League which had now also entered the Labour Party. The new organisation, also called the Workers' Socialist League, mostly worked through the Socialist Organiser Alliance. It also produced a theoretical journal, Workers' Socialist Review. In 1984, the groups split apart. The key issue was the Falklands War: most of the former I-CL argued for the defeat of both sides; most of the former WSL supported a victory for Argentina. The tensions had also been strained over questions of internal democracy and differences over the national question.

The Socialist Organiser Alliance grew from the broad left Socialist Campaign for a Labour Victory. By 1983 the paper had become identified with Matgamna's supporters, leading to a split with Labour left politicians such as Ken Livingstone over the GLC's policy of increasing rates to offset cuts in central government grants to local councils.

The group organised its student work through the National Organisation of Labour Students (NOLS), forming Socialist Students in NOLS (SSiN) to campaign within the National Union of Students.

Throughout the 1980s, the group had reassessed its politics and reappraised the Third Camp tradition of heterodox and dissident Trotskyists including Max Shachtman and Hal Draper. The group adopted a two-state position on Israel-Palestine, and in 1988, moved away from its original position that the Stalinist states were "deformed or degenerated workers states". By the 1990s the majority of organisation had adopted a bureaucratic collectivist analysis, with a minority holding a state capitalist position.

Socialist Organiser was banned by the Labour Party in 1990. In response to the ban, the Socialist Organiser Alliance dissolved. In 1992, the editorial board of Socialist Organiser launched an organisation known as the Alliance for Workers' Liberty. Since 1999 the AWL has stood candidates in local and general elections, either through left unity initiatives such as the Socialist Alliance, Socialist Alliance Democracy Platform and Socialist Green Unity Coalition or independently. It has also maintained a focus on pushing affiliated trade unions to assert themselves against the Labour leadership and was involved in the establishment of the Labour Representation Committee in 2004 to which it is affiliated.

—from wikipedia entry on the AWL

These digital issues of Workers Liberty and Solidarity are reproduced here with the kind permission of the Alliance for Workers’ Liberty, the journals’ publishers,. There are some issues that are missing and none of the ones prior to No. 118 have yet been digitized (nor the predecessor publications of the AWL) since they were created in the first place in a digital format. These will have to be scanned by the AWL.




Workers Liberty
incorporating Reason in Revolt

Volume 3, No. 0, September 22, 2005
Volume 3, No. 3, March 3, 2006
Volume 3, No. 5, June 5, 2006
Volume 3, No. 10, March 10, 2007
Volume 3, No. 11, April 11, 2007
Volume 3, No. 11 (differently organized pages), April 11, 2007
Volume 3, No. 12, , 2007
Volume 3, No. 15, June 12, 2007
Volume 3, No. 16, September, 2007
Volume 3, No. 17, January, 2008
Volume 3, No. 18, April, 2008
Volume 3, No. 19, May, 2008
Volume 3, No. 21, July, 2008
Volume 3, No. 22, September, 2008
Volume 3, No. 23, July, 2009
Volume 3, No. 24, October, 2009
Volume 3, No. 25, November, 2009
Volume 3, No. 26, December, 2009
Volume 3, No. 27, January, 2009
Volume 3, No. 28, March, 2010
Volume 3, No. 29, June, 2010
Volume 3, No. 30, July, 2010
Volume 3, No. 31, July, (misprint on month, should be August) 2010
Volume 3, No. 32, January, 2011
Volume 3, No. 33, May, 2011
Volume 3, text from issue No. 34,
Volume 3, No. 35, November, 2011
Volume 3, No. 36, no date
Volume 3, No. 37, May, 2012
Volume 3, No. 38, March, 2013
Volume 3, No. 39, April, 2013
Volume 3, No. 40, June, 2013
Volume 3, No. 41, August, 2013
Volume 3, No. 42, January 2014
Volume 3, No. 45, October, 2014
Volume 3, No. 46, November, 2014
Volume 3, No. 47, December, 2014
Volume 3, No. 48, December/January, 2014
Volume 3, No. 49, October, 2015
Volume 3, No. 50, November, 2015
Volume 3, No. 51, December, 2015
Volume 3, No. 53, March, 2016
Volume 3, No. 54, June, 2016
Volume 3, No. 55, October, 2016

Solidarity & Workers Liberty

Volume 3, No. 118, September 27, 2007
Volume 3, No. 119, October 13, 2007
Volume 3, No. 120, October 25, 2007
Volume 3, No. 121, November 8, 2007
Volume 3, No. 122, November 22, 2007
Volume 3, No. 123, December 3, 2007
Volume 3, No. 124, January 10, 2008
Volume 3, No. 125, January 24, 2008
Volume 3, No. 126, February 7, 2008
Volume 3, No. 127, February 21, 2008
Volume 3, No. 128, March 6, 2008
Volume 3, No. 129, March 20, 2008
Volume 3 No. 157 20 August 2009
Volume 3 No 158 10 September 2009
Volume 3 No 159 24 September 2009
Volume 3 No 160 8 October 2009
Volume 3 No 161 22 October 2009
Volume 3 No 162 5 November 2008
Volume 3 No 163 16 November 2009
Volume 3 No 164 10 December 2009
Volume 3 No 165 14 January 2010
Volume 3 No 166 4 February 2010
Volume 3 No 169 18 March 2010
Volume 3 No 170 1 April 2010
Volume 3 No 171 15 April 2010
Volume 3 No 172 29 April 2010
Volume 3 No 173 13 May 2010
Volume 3 No 174 27 May 2010
Volume 3 No. 175 10 June 2010
Volume 3 No 176 24 June 2010
Volume 3 No 181 23 September 2010
Volume 3 No 182 7 October 2010
Volume 3 No 183 21 October 2010
Volume 3 No 184 4 November 2010
Volume 3 No 175 [mistakingly labled No. 177] 18 November 2010
Volume 3 No 186 2 December 2010
Volume 3 No 187 16 December 2010
Volume 3 No 188 12 January 2011
Volume 3 No 189 19 January 2011
Volume 3 No 190 26 January 2011
Volume 3 No 191 2 February 2011
Volume 3 No 192 9 February 2011
Volume 3 No 193 16 February 2011
Volume 3 No 194 23 February 2011
Volume 3 No 195 2 March 2011
Volume 3 No 196 9 March 2011
Volume 3 No 197 16 March 2011
Volume 3 No 198 23 March 2011
Volume 3 No 199 30 March 2011
Volume 3 No 200 6 April 2011
Volume 3 No 201 20 April 2011
Volume 3 No 202 4 May 2011
Volume 3 No 203 11 May 2011
No 210 29 June 2011
No 211 8 July 2011
No 212 20 July 2011
No 213 3 August 2011
No 214 24 August 2011
No 215 7 September 2011
No 216 14 September 2011
No 217 21 September 2011
No 218 28 September 2011
No 219 5 October 2011
No 220 12 October 2011
No 221 19 October 2011
No 222 26 October 2011
No 223 2 November 2011
No 224 9 November 2011
No 225 17 November 2011
No 226 23 November 2011
No 227 1 December 2011
No 228 14 December 2011
No 229 11 January 2012
No 230 18 January 2012
No 231 25 January 2012
No 232 1 February 2012
No 233 8 February 2012
No 234 15 February 2012
No 235 22 February 2012
No 236 29 February 2012
No 237 7 March 2012
No 238 14 March 2012
No 239 21 March 2012
No 240 28 March 2012
No 241 11 April 2012
No 242 18 April 2012
No 243 25 April 2012
No 244 2 May 2012
No 245 9 May
No 246 16 May 2012
No 247 23 May 2012
No 248 6 June 2012
No 249 13 June 2012
No 250 20 June 2012
No 251 29 June 2012
No 252 11 July 2012
No 253 1 August 2012
No 254 22 August 2012
No 255 5 September 2012
No 256 12 September 2012
No 257 19 September 2012
No 258 26 September 2012
No 259 3 October 2012
No 260 10 October 2012
No 261 17 October 2012
No 262 26 October 2012
No 263 7 November 2012
No 264 14 November 2012
No 265 21 November 2012
No 266 28 November 2013
No 267 5 December 2012
No 268 12 December 2012
No 269 9 January 2013
No 270 16 January 2013
No 271 23 January 2013
No 272 30 January 2013
No 273 6 February 2013
No 274 13 February 2013
No 275 20 February 2013
No 276 27 February
No 260 6 March 2013
No 278 13 March 2013
No 279 20 March 2013
No 280 27 March 2013
No 281 10 April 2013
No 282 17 April 2013
No 283 24 April 2013
No 284 1 May 2013
No 285 8 May 2013
No 286 15 May 2013
No 287 29 May 2013
No 288 5 June 2013
No 290 21 June 2013
No 291 3 July 2013
No 292 17 July 2013
no 293 7 August 2013
No 294 28 August 2013
No 295 11 September 2013
No 296 18 September 2013
No 297 25 September 2013
No 298 2 October 2013
No 299 9 October 2013
No 300 16 October 2013
No 301 25 October 2013
No 302 6 November 2013
No 303 13 November 2013
No 304 20 November 2013
No 305 27 November 2013
No 306 4 December 2013
No 307 11 December 2013
No. 308 8 January 2014
No 309 15 January 2014
No 310 22 January 2014
No 311 29 January 2014
No 312 5 February 2014
No 313 12 February 2014
No 314 26 February
No 315 5 March 2014
No 316 12 March 2014
No 317 17 March 2014
No 318 26 March 2014
No 319 2 April 2014
No 320 9 April 2014
No 321 23 April 2014
No 322 30 April 2014
No 323 7 May 2014
No 324 14 May 2014
No 325 21 May 2014
No 326 4 June 2014
No 327 11 June 2014
No 328 18 June 2014
No 329 25 June 2014
No 330 4 July 2014
No 331 16 July 2014
No 332 28 July 2014
No 333 13 August 2014
No 334 1 September 2014
No 335 10 September 2014
No 336 17 September 2014
No 337 24 September 2014
No 338 1 October 2014
No 339 8 October 2014
No 340 15 October 2014
No 341 25 October 2014
No 342 5 November 2014
No 343 12 November 2014
No 344 19 November 2014
No 345 26 November
No 347 10 December 2014

For more recent issues of Solidarity and Workers' Liberty, please visit the web site of the AWL



 


 

Last updated on 16 August 2016